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How Long Blues - Milt Jackson & Ray Charles - Soul Brothers (Vinyl, LP, Album)

9 thoughts on “ How Long Blues - Milt Jackson & Ray Charles - Soul Brothers (Vinyl, LP, Album) ”

  1. Feb 14,  · Ray Charles is just such a soulful player on any instrument, but when he plays saxophone on 'Soul Brothers' you can almost feel him crying into that horn. I am sure Saxophone professionals would think that it lacks the tone of say Charlie Parker, or the smoothness of Stan Getz, but it wails like an old blues ragtime session in a cane field/5(35).
  2. Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for Soul Brothers [Hallmark] - Ray Charles, Milt Jackson on AllMusic.
  3. Milt Jackson & Ray Charles: Soul Brothers (LP, Vinyl record album) - One of the great jazz sessions that Ray Charles cut towards the end of his years at Atlantic Records -- Dusty Groove is Chicago's Online Record Store.
  4. Aug 10,  · Taken from my vinyl copy of the album 'Soul Brothers', released in Recorded 12 September, Personnel: Milt Jackson- Vibraharpe, piano Ray Charles- Piano, alto sax Billy Mitchell- Tenor.
  5. Label: Atlantic - • Format: Vinyl LP, Album, Mono • Country: US • Genre: Jazz • Style: Soul-Jazz Milt Jackson & Ray Charles - Soul Brothers (, Vinyl) | Discogs Explore/5(34).
  6. Aug 31,  · Ray Charles is just such a soulful player on any instrument, but when he plays saxophone on 'Soul Brothers' you can almost feel him crying into that horn. I am sure Saxophone professionals would think that it lacks the tone of say Charlie Parker, or the smoothness of Stan Getz, but it wails like an old blues ragtime session in a cane field/5(36).
  7. Dec 15,  · Label: Atlantic - SD • Format: Vinyl LP, Album, Stereo, Reissue • Country: US • Genre: Jazz, Funk / Soul • Style: Post Bop, Rhythm & Blues Milt Jackson & Ray Charles - Soul Brothers (, Vinyl) | Discogs/5(6).
  8. Soul Brothers continued in this fashion. Soul Brothers contains some excellent music, with long, free, intricate interplay helping to create moment after moment of sheer beauty. Interestingly, the slow, nine-minute-plus “How Long Blues” sees Ray returning to a song from his second-ever release, a 78 rpm disc from November with the McSon Trio.

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